5
ALL CHICAGOANS (LEADERS INCLUDED) CAN
PLAY TRUSTWORTHY TELEVISED PUBLIC SAFETY GAMES
WITH RULES TAKEN FROM TV SPORTS TELECASTS
AND VOTING PRACTICES FROM REALITY TV 

These televised, rule-governed games do for public safety what rule-governed TV sports contests do for Chicago's beloved pro sports teams: they earns and maintain citywide RESPECT and TRUST.

What's more, these games work to complement restore functionality to the great (if imperfectly) rule-governed game of voter-driven American democracy.

This digital-age reconfiguration of responsibility for public safety is seismic  in democracies worldwide. In means, in effect,  that cities  must learn to think and act as cities - as large, connected communities - in order to make themselves safe. It also means, among other things, that a city's media, as its public communications system, have one  or more critical new roles play in helping a city make itself safe. In addition to its traditional roles of "covering" violence by reporting on incidents of violence and commenting on the effectiveness of a city's efforts to address it, media may play - and assume responsibilities for - connecting and facilitating or even mediating the efforts of components 1  through 4 to make their city SAFE FOR ALL RESIDENTS.  

Chicago's digital-age challenge is for all five of these components to devise ways of sharing responsibility for public safety. This seismic change the sources of power and authority itself changes forever they way cities (and nations) govern themselves. In Chicago and with respect to public safety and the role the city's media in "covering" it, it means that In addition to simply reporting and commenting on violence, the media that comprise Chicago's digital-age public communications system will now connect, facilitate and even mediate the efforts of components 1 through 4, above, to address violence in ways that make Chicago SAFE for all residents.

This digital-age reconfiguration of responsibility for public safety in Chicago is seismic. It means, among other things, that Chicago's media, as the city's public communications system, will have critical new roles play in addressing the city's violence. In addition to playing its traditional roles of covering violence by reporting on incidents of it and commenting on the effectiveness of the city's violence reduction efforts, Chicago's media will have the new option (and responsibility, if media accept it) of playing one or more of three distinct digital-age roles pertaining  to public safety. These the roles of connecting, facilitating and/or even mediating the efforts of components 1  through 4 to address violence in ways that work not so much to reduce violence as to make Chicago SAFE  for all residents